THE MIGHTY DIAMONDS

Fitzroy “Bunny” Simpson (Vocals)
Donald “Tabby Shaw (Lead Vocals)
Lloyd Judge Ferguson (Vocals)

As the Hope Diamond is a American national treasure, the Mighty Diamonds are Jamaican national treasures.

Every reggae fan has at least one favorite song by the Mighty Diamonds:

“Pass the Kutchie,” “Right Time,” “Master Plan” “Tamarind Farm,” and the list goes on. Formed in Trench Town, 1969, Jamaica’s premier harmony trio are currently celebrating 40 years of making music, from the most militant roots reggae to the sweetest lover’s rock.

The Mighty Diamonds–Fitzroy, “Bunny” Simpson, Donald “Tabby” Shaw and Lloyd “Judg

e” Ferguson–know what soul is all about. The three reggae warriors have risen from the poverty and despair of inner city Kingston to become learned reggae ambassadors who have traveled throughout Europe, the U.S., Africa and Japan spreading the gospel of harmony and emancipation from mental slavery.

“Right Time,“ The Mighty Diamonds’ breakthrough album on the Channel One label, elevated the group to rock star status in 1975. Produced by Joseph Hoo Kim, “Right Time” brought together the Jamaican musical elite such as Sly and Robby (drum and bass) and Ancel Collins (keyboards) generated hits such as “Africa,” “Have Mercy” “Natural Natty,” “Them Never Love Poor Marcus” and the reggae party album, “Pass the Kutchie,” which has been sampled by everyone from Lauryn Hill to Michael Franti to Wyclef Jean.

With wisdom and experience behind them, not to mention

more albums and singles than they can count, the Mighty Diamonds are still selling out venues around the world. Led by Tabby’s ebullient tenor, their live

show is a journey through the African Diaspora from gospel to R&B to roots reggae and dancehall, including covers of songs by the Stylistics (“Country Living”) Bob Marley, (“Get Up, Stand Up”) Curtis Mayfield (“It’s All Right to Have a Good Time”) Jester Hairston (“Amen”) and AltonEllis (“Still in Love”).

During their February tour in celebration of Black History Month this year, the Mighty Diamonds made a surprise visit to the Dome school in Takilma, Oregon, discussing their culture and singing with the children.

The Mighty Diamonds have appeared on a number of compilations including “Is it Rolling Bob? A Reggae Tribute to Bob Dylan” (Sanctuary, 2004), “Old to the New” A Steely & Clevie Tribute to Joe Gibbs Classics” (VP, 2002) and “Fire on the Mountain: Reggae Celebrates The Grateful Dead (“Pow Wow, 1996). During the Christmas season, the Diamonds’ lively version of “Frosty the Snowman” (Ras Records) is a hit with young and old. The Mighty Diamonds are currently promoting their latest CD, “Thugs in the Street,” produced on their independent label.